Monday, October 6, 2014

You Know You Need to Kill Your Cell Phone If . . .



So you're driving through Hollywood somewhere and spot Kirsten Dunst of Spiderman fame - what do you do?

Do you stop, jump out your car, and take a selfie? Well, that's just what happened in this short film. Think this is just a bit of exaggeration? I doubt it. But that's not the only sign that you are addicted to your cell phone.

You know you need to kill your cell phone if . . .

  • you have ever run into a pole (or any other large item) while texting.
  • you can't remember how to write with a pen or pencil anymore and find yourself just taking pictures of the notes on the board.
  • feel an event didn't happen unless you take a bazillion selfies on your phone while attending.
  • can't make it through a family meal (or any meal for that matter) without picking up your phone.
  • can feel your phone vibrating inside your pocket when it is in your purse or backpack.
  • can't handle not being able to see your cell phone 24-hours a day because it causes you mental anxiety.
  • have to have answer your cell phone while you should be sleeping OR keeping your cell phone under your pillow or on your nightstand.
  • check your cell phone before you brush your teeth in the morning.
  • incessantly check social media to see what your "friends" are doing.
  • passing one of your cell phone friends on campus (or see them in the gym) and completely ignore them.
  • and, finally, see Kirsten Dunst standing on the side of the road and instead of talking to her, insist on snapping a couple of selfies.
What other behaviors would you add to this list?

49 comments:

  1. • you trip and are more concerned about how you dropped your phone rather than if you’re hurt or not
    • you forget your phone at home and feel lost the entire day
    • hang out with friends and look up from your phone to realize the whole group is on their phones.
    • Instead of really enjoying a concert, you stand there recording the whole thing for social media.
    • Can’t start eating your food unless you take a picture of it
    • Imagine the sound of your phone going off even when it’s not
    • You waited in line for two days to purchase your phone
    • Get overly emotional when your phone dies and no one has the same charger as you
    • Need to have your phone in your sights at all times
    • Can’t get through class without checking your phone
    • Spend an extra hour getting ready because you were distracted by your phone
    • You actually respond to peoples’ texts even in the shower
    • You can’t entertain yourself without your phone

    The list goes on and on. I think this topic is really funny but it also amazes me because I could think of so many things. It really proves that most of my generation is overly attached to technology. Phones do make life a lot easier because they’re like computers in our pockets, and they make it convenient to document memories. Although, we miss out on a lot of things when we’re looking down at our phones. From going on road trips to hanging out with friends, we don’t really see the scenery or pay attention to the conversation. It shouldn't be a challenge to put our phones away and actually be there to enjoy the experience.

    ReplyDelete
  2. -if you are ready to fight someone if they take your phone
    -you can travel all the way back home if you forgot you left your phone
    -can't go to the bathroom without having it with you
    -feel your leg or bag is vibrating and your phone isn't with you
    -if you look at it every 35 seconds
    -get upset if someone calls you and ask why didn't they text you
    -run to put your phone on the charger before it dies
    -you can't hold a simple conversation
    -can't spell without autocorrect

    ReplyDelete
  3. Some other things I would add to the list is:
    1. If you walk slower because your texting and you cant wait till you stop and sit down.
    2. Not being able to remember your password to things because you wrote them in your phone.
    3. Think you will "die" without it.
    4. Not remembering any important numbers such as your parents or siblings.
    5.Always charging your phone.
    6. Cant sleep without it near you.
    7. Taking pictures of things just to post it on social media, bragging or flaunting what you did for "likes".
    8. Think your phone is nothing if you don't have the latest update.
    9. Texting without looking on a touchscreen.

    ReplyDelete
  4. 1. You can't even go to the bathroom without taking your phone with you.
    2. Instead of sitting in class listening to the professor your own on your phone the whole time.
    3. Instead of reading an actual book you decide to buy a Kindle and read it on there.
    4. Taking a picture of a beautiful scenery instead of enjoying the view.
    5. Asking Siri for answers to every question.
    6. You're in a room filled with about 20 people and instead of interacting with them you decide to stay glued to your phone.
    7. Check your screen every 15 seconds to see if anyone messaged you.
    8. Taking pictures of everything when your out.
    9. Being on your phone when your on a lunch date
    10. Can't even go for a walk or a run without your phone.

    ReplyDelete
  5. - Need your phone to document everything you do
    - Wont go somewhere if your phone is about to die
    - Can't express affection to someone in person, only via text message
    - Only want to do something so you can share it on a social media
    - Cant follow a conversation because you're too caught up in your phone
    - Leave a classroom to answer your phone

    The list is one that can always be continued. Sadly several of these issues are ones that I personally experience with my phone today. Regardless of what people think about this generation, cell phones have become more of a necessity than an obsession. I do agree that they are ever used and especially brought out at wrong timing but they are a vital part of todays living. There is definitely a time and place for the usage of our telephones. But sometimes the extremes pointed out aren't as extreme as people make them out to be.

    ReplyDelete
  6. • You care more about your phone's well being than your own.
    • You feel stressed when you get a text during class and aren't able to check on it.
    • No occasion is complete without taking a selfie (or multiple ones in which you end up uploading to social media so your friends know you're doing something oh-so-special.
    • You obsessively check for 'likes' on the above picture and get upset when no one seems to care.
    • When you start to feel uncomfortable talking face to face with a person, even though you text everyday.
    • Panic when you can't find your phone.
    • You find yourself sharing personal information or emotionally rant on social media.
    • You're at dinner and find everyone spending more time looking at screens rather than with each other.
    • You haven't turned it off at least once in a day.
    • Tell yourself it's time for bed but just end up laying in bed for hours looking at your phone.

    It's actually quite funny how much this generation rely on phones and social media to even function properly. After reading each point, I laughed a little to myself because I've either seen these things happen, or I know people who would literally become a ball of anxiety if any of these things were to happen to them. It's amazing how far we've reached with technology -- with just one click, we're connected to people across the globe. Everything is easy to share now. But what ever happened to experiencing the simplest pleasures by ourselves? Relish in the beauty of the sunset as I walk home -- not on a screen as I fish for 'likes.' Articles like these really puts things that our generation are so used to in perspective. We've grown up around screens and technological breakthroughs. It makes me wonder how dependent on technology we'll be in the future, or if it'd be a daily routine to be facing a screen all day. It wouldn't be too far off to our present.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think this topic is true today, especially with me or the other young people addicting in his or her cellphone. Personally, I believe we cannot stay away our cellphone in 24 hours a day. Not everyone, but almost, cellphone become popular and cannot replace with any devices. We cannot deny cellphone is very useful, but we should not abuse it. I agree with the author, and I also have lots of behaviors like:
    - Surfing Facebook in the class.
    - Texting with friends through a family meal.
    - Watching soccer while studying.
    - Instead of enjoy the show or concern, just taking pictures.
    - Checking Facebook everywhere, anytime.
    - Waste lots of time when playing game.

    ReplyDelete
  8. -If you feel like you life is over when your phone is at one percent.
    -When you are out with your fiends and instead of having a conversation you are on your phone.
    -If you are going somewhere to eat, and the first thing you have to do is take a picture of your food and post it on some social media site.
    -When you keep your phone right next to you when you shower.
    -When you do not remember where you left your phone and can not find it with in five minutes and you start feeling anxious
    -When you are already outside of class and you realized that you left your phone in your car and you walk to the other end of campus just to get your phone.
    -When you forget your phone at home and feel like you left your brain there too.
    -When you look at your screen like every sixty seconds.

    I feel like the way many people have gotten attached to technology is crazy. There are many people who can not be comfortable with out their phones in their hands. Some people can not keep up a normal conversation because they are too busy checking their phone. It has become a big issue! Even though our phones do entertain us, we should try and set our phones aside and go out and try new things.

    ReplyDelete
  9. -You lose that social interaction when you are hanging out with your friends or partner because you are on your phone
    -have to Instagram or Facebook your food before you start eating
    -when you easily use up your phone battery in an hour
    -when you post pictures every 3hrs a day on social media
    -you easily run out of things to say or talk about when you are talking to someone in person
    -you are able to express yourself better when you are texting
    -you forget about your surroundings when you are constantly on your phone

    This continuous list of how people get really attached to their phones, shows that technology has changed our world. We tend to lose that social interaction (not texting but talking to each other in person) when we go out with others. There are times when we don't have our phones, we feel lost. This is because we are too reliant on technology. Though, we can still make memories more enjoyable when we don't always have our phones with us.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I believe that this video says it all because these actions are so true. Since I am still young myself at times i do fine myself always on my phone. Personally I do not like it i try to not be on my cell phone all the time. Other actions that occur are
    -write notes on your cellphone
    -when your battery becomes low and you are freaking out
    -when you feel you talk to that person more in text and in person it is dead silent
    -when you find yourself on social media every 15min

    going off the last thing I said when you add up all these times you are on social media is when you can be productive and get your school work done instead of stressing last min.

    One thing that I caught myself doing was when I would go site seeing or to a theme park I caught myself looking at these beautiful places through my camera on my cell phone and it was not me enjoying this memorable moment.

    Overall I feel that technology has took a toll on most people in society today.

    ReplyDelete
  11. - You feel disconnected with your social life when you're not with your phone.
    - Getting your phone taken away as punishment might be the worst punishment.
    - You don't know where to look for the time without your phone
    - You don't know how to wake yourself up without your phone's alarm
    - Hanging out with your friends means scrolling through your Twitter and Instagram feed together
    - You have to take a picture of something -- whether it's food or the fact that it's raining (we have the weather app for that) -- no matter how irrelevant it is to your followers' life
    - When you go to someone's house you first ask them what the WiFi password is
    - When you don't have your phone and no one to talk to you immediately feel like everyone is judging you for looking like a loner without a phone
    - ESPECIALLY if you start getting SO obsessed with getting followers on Instagram that you dedicate your life to promoting your profile, which by the way, doesn't have a lot of quality pictures that deserve the 100 likes you're asking for

    Most of these, unfortunately, I can actually relate to (except for the last one, I am above that). It's actually really disappointing to watch our generation let their lives pass by while their eyes are glued to a glowing screen. And when we do take part on what's going on outside our phone, we STILL feel the need to take a picture of what we're seeing or write about and post about whatever you're experiencing. I think that it's good to document your experience because it's nice to look back at them and have a good dose of nostalgia. BUT, if our phone is overused by taking more pictures or posting more tweets than necessary, that's when we need to put the phone down.

    ReplyDelete
  12. These are all true! From my own experiences:
    -a guy passed by me during valentines while I was on my phone and said, “You’re on your phone while walking and didn’t even noticed that your soul mate just passed by… Happy Valentines!” This got me giggles inside.
    -texting while driving, sorry!
    -sneaking through phone while at work, class or in the bathroom.
    -constantly taking pictures of every meal, breakfast, lunch, desserts and dinner and making a collage out of it to post it on Instagram.
    -remembering and depending on Facebook for a friend’s or relative’s birthday
    These are just some. I believe there are more who are more addicted than me. I don’t do most of the examples given in the article and I can still live without my phone for at LEAST A DAY. ;P As long as I am with the people I talk to most of the time, then I am good.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I can definitely relate to what happened in this short film. The difference is that I will take selfies with my favorite band members but I will strike up a conversation as well.
    Things to add to list are:
    -Hanging out with your friends but that only means all of you are on your phones.
    -"Watching a movie" with friends but all of you are on social media.
    -Whenever you feel bored you turn to social media for entertainment.
    -As soon as you meet someone you tell them to follow you on instagram or add you on snapchat.
    -You constantly check how many new likes your picture has.
    -You can't go to Starbucks without letting your followers know you got a pumpkin spice latte.
    -You go on social media to avoid interaction with an acquaintance when you run into them.
    - You constantly talk about social media, your followers and the likes you received.
    -You care more about your followers than your grades.
    -While doing homework you constantly check your social media.
    -When someone mentions something about what someone posted you automatically look it up.

    I can definitely relate to most of these but I am currently off of all social media and it is not as bad as I thought it would be.

    ReplyDelete
  14. The video may be a bit exaggerated, however, it would not be impossible if people really began to forget how to speak to one another. This video portrays how social media is taking over the lives of people from this generation. For instance, the two girls would rather take pictures with Kirsten Dunst than actually strike up a conversation with Ms. Dunst. There are other ways in which a cell phone interferes with our lives

    - Hesitating to perform a task because your cell phone received a notification.
    - Not being able to respond to a verbal question because you’re too caught up with what is happening in your cell phone.
    - Feeling the need to document you’re daily life on social media to keep your followers updated.
    - Responding to text messages instead of socializing with people around you.
    - When your self-esteem depends on the amount of likes you received on your last photo.
    Since the development of cell phones people have argued how technology is going to take over our lives and that can be seen with a few people nowadays. I understand how being too involved in your cell phone can result with not being able to interact more with others, however, as humans we feel as if we are interacting with people. The only difference is that social media is a virtual world where people can be seen how they want to be seen. To many people, the way they are seen in the eyes of others is actually important.

    ReplyDelete
  15. In our generation we use our phones for everything and it will be a big deal if we leave our phones at home. It seems that our phones are glued to our hands. I agree with the items on the list and I have a few to add:
    -Tripping off the concrete that is not leveled because we are focused on texting and not walking.
    -Not being able to acknowledge that an individual is speaking to us because we are focused on our cell phone.
    -On a date and can't seem to get off social media and texting our friends with out talking to the person at the table.
    -Hit someone or another car while driving because we are texting.
    -If you drop your phone in your cereal because we can't seem to stop checking social media. (this happened to a friend of mine)
    -If someone drops his or her phone in the toilet because that person decided to text on the toilet. (This happened to someone else I know.
    Our generation tend to lack effective communication. This is why people break up with others via text since there is lack of verbal communication among others. I am aware how we are so addicted and I try to maintain some self control.

    ReplyDelete
  16. In this day and age we can barely walk two steps without obsessing over a notification we just go on our phones. We rather look at what people are doing on social media then see how they people around us are. Personally I don't get it. I don't have any social media and some may find that crazy but I don't see it as worth my time, I don't care what people I don't know are doing and I don't want to see how many strangers are willing to follow me. I agreed with everything this post listed but there are a few more like:
    -Being on vaction and only worrying about what nice pictures you'll take to post
    -witnessing something beautiful but instead of looking at it, your watching it through your cell phone screen because your to busy recording it
    -having dinner with friends but not saying a word because your to busy taking pics of your food and posting that your hanging out with your friends
    -someone is talking to you but your not aware because your so interested in what's going on in your phone
    -if you started looking at your phone at 2 and realized that its 5 and time has passed and you forgot to do something because you completely lost track of time on your phone
    -if you'd rather be on the phone with someone than go out with people

    ReplyDelete
  17. I think that the following behaviors indicate that you are addicted to your cell phone:
    - you panic more when you lose your cell phone than your social security
    - you show awkward behavior when you are face-to-face with the people that you text on a daily basis
    - when you look at your phone every five minutes in class
    - when you are on a date and you are consistently texting people all through the date
    -when you text someone for 40 minutes, when in actuality it has been eight hours
    -when you would rather text people about their day instead of meeting up with them face-to-face.
    The list goes on when it comes to how addicted people are when they are on their phones. What is worse, is that this is actually ruining our social lives because we act differently when we are on a phone rather than in person. Everywhere you go, people are on their phone and it cannot only kill your social life, but also your life in general. It has gotten so bad, that there are now laws banning people from talking on the phone, which by the way should be common sense not to talk on the phone, especially texting. However, unlike all fads, this one will probably be around for a while.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I think that the following behaviors indicate that you are addicted to your cell phone:
    - you panic more when you lose your cell phone than your social security
    - you show awkward behavior when you are face-to-face with the people that you text on a daily basis
    - when you look at your phone every five minutes in class
    - when you are on a date and you are consistently texting people all through the date
    -when you text someone for 40 minutes, when in actuality it has been eight hours
    -when you would rather text people about their day instead of meeting up with them face-to-face.
    The list goes on when it comes to how addicted people are when they are on their phones. What is worse, is that this is actually ruining our social lives because we act differently when we are on a phone rather than in person. Everywhere you go, people are on their phone and it cannot only kill your social life, but also your life in general. It has gotten so bad, that there are now laws banning people from talking on the phone, which by the way should be common sense not to talk on the phone, especially texting. However, unlike all fads, this one will probably be around for a while.

    ReplyDelete
  19. In society today everything revolves around technology including cell phones. Your cell phone allows you to check social media to see what is happening with celebrities, check to see what your friends are doing or events they have been to, or even to see what the weather is going to be for the day. With the new generation, they just check their cell phones to find out the weather instead of turning to the news. They lose value in how important it is to put down their cell phones and focus on what is happening in the world around them. They go on social media sites such as Instagram and Facebook to get updated on the “important” things that the news said such as murder, traffic, and entertainment. In my opinion you know that you are addicted to your phone when instead of focusing on the road while in traffic you take a picture or post a video of it on Instagram. You take the time out to pull out your phone capture the picture and write a caption saying this traffic is no good for me or stuck in traffic. society checks there cell phones and social media sites like it is the daily newspaper, and in order to stay up to date in this generation you must have the newest social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Tumblr. You also know when you are addicted to your phone when you search your social media sites while in class. Instead of paying attention to the lecture and taking notes, you go on facebook or twitter and write this class is so boring. Instead of asking question in the class you go on social sites and say you have no idea what your professor is talking about. This shows that in this generation technology can be addicting

    ReplyDelete
  20. • You cannot hold a face to face conversation for over 15 minutes
    • Start stressing yourself out once your battery life on your phone hits 20 percent
    • You cannot remember the spelling of simple words like “because “ or “about”
    • You do not know the actual names of your “friends” or “followers” when you see them in real life
    • When you use the word hashtag in a conversation
    • You have a mental break down when you cannot find your phone charger
    • Going out to eat and not talking to your dinner companion because you are glued to your phone the whole night
    • When you cannot use the restroom without having your phone with you
    • Having to take a picture of your food before you can eat it

    ReplyDelete
  21. People today cannot even go a day or yet just under an hour in my opinion without looking through there smartphones. Not once in every of my class that I do not see a student use his or her cell phone in lecture. I see it on their desk, looking down texting someone, or even taking what we called “selfies” in class because they want to. I do not understand why people are so attach to their smartphone and not worry what is around them most of the time. I have owned a smartphone for at least five years now and I do not seem to be addicted to my phone and with the list it provides. Out of the eleven that was listed only one was applied to me was about the vibration in your backpack. The list that was there I do agree how it can happen to some people and more to be added in my opinion be like:
    - Hearing your phone vibrate realizing its not
    - Going out on a lunch with family/friends and you’re the only one looking at your screen while others are having a conversation
    - Texting/calling while driving even though you know it’s the law not to but you do it anyways
    - Instead of getting out of their car and ringing your friend’s doorbell you decide to text them to get out because they are here in front of the house
    - After meeting some mutual friend’s you go through Facebook/Instagram/Twitter/etc and follow them right afterward.
    - “checking your phone” even when you do not have to because you either want to get out of a conversation you had with a stranger in the shuttle line (that happened to me)
    - Looking through your phone setting because you’re bored
    - You have a portable charger around you so your phone doesn’t die out

    ReplyDelete
  22. To be completely honest I found this blog hilarious since people think that their phone and social media is their life. But at the same time i found it very alarming since this is what the majority of the people are doing every single day with their mobile device's. You can add to the list above such as:
    -feeling vibration in your pocket when you don't even have your phone with you
    -having the feeling of being incomplete without your phone
    -feeling bored so u go to your phone
    -having a portable charger so your phone is always charged
    -needing to take a picture of food before you eat it

    The reason why I found this blog alarming as well is because of the increasing death rate to using your cell phones as a necessity. For example, using your phone checking your social medias while driving! There has been accidents that involves injuries and death due to people not looking at the road while driving to look at an incoming text or phone call.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I found this quite relatable, more in comparison to my roommates rather than myself. I was however surprised that many of these did in fact apply to me, I have never really seen myself as someone phone addicted. For example, I often sleep with my phone under my pillow so that I don't miss anything,because in the past I have missed out on a few fun opportunities because I didn't hear that one text or phone call. The one about taking lots of selfies, because if there is no photo proof it didn't happen relates to my roommate, she feels the need to snapchat every aspect of our daily life whether it be brushing our teeth or on our way to the dining commons. Some things to add to this list or occurrences that I have experienced recently.

    -You go to a concert, and rather than watching the artist performing directly, your watching your phone so that you can record it. You do that in hopes that you can experience it time and time again, when in fact you never "really experienced it" because you were staring at your phone.
    - you have been texting so long, and your fun to text with. However, when it comes to a phone conversation you nor the other person know what to say. (awkward silence)
    -you use your phone to order pizza hut online, when in actuality you could have called, saving you a fraction of the time.
    -when you and your friends find interesting stuff on insta or pinterest, you don't explain or say anything, you just tag or send it to them.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I am guilty of all but three points on this list. I do not check my phone before brushing my teeth because I am usually running late, or else I would. I always take notes in class because it is easier for me to remember things after i have written them down first but I do occasionally take pictures of notes, but only when I can not keep up. Thirdly, I would never jump out of the car to take a picture with this lady without first introducing myself and asking if I can take a picture, then I would take it and leave. To this list I would add the following:

    -organize a friend hangout and everyone ends up being on their phone.
    -have dreams about breaking the phone's screen.
    -unable to leave the house without your phone.
    -feel strange without your cell phone.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I hate to admit it, but I do in fact sleep with my phone under my pillow. I listen to audiobooks to fall asleep and set my alarm on my phone so I do keep it with me in bed. The versatility of the my phone does make it my go-to device to navigate my academic and social life. However, I do draw the line at a certain point. For example, I cannot for the life of me understand why people sitting in the same room feel the need to text each other. They are literally feet away from each other yet they act as if they have lost the ability to have a face to face conversation. There is also the sad reality that after friends make plans to hang out together all they do "together" is sit there on their electronic devices. Another sign that you are way too attached to your phone is when you cannot look someone in the eye and hold a stimulating conversation for more than fifteen minutes.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I feel guilty using cell phone all the time, after I read this post. Here are some more that I can add to the original list:
    • Can’t look at your friends face, because you are always looking at a phone when you are with her/him.
    • Can’t engage conversation without talking about any kind of social media.
    • Can’t go anywhere when your phone is about to die.
    • Have to take Snapchat wherever you go and document it.
    • Have to have your phone in your sight everywhere you go.
    • Can’t go anywhere that has bad signal or no signal at all. (ex. camping)
    • Always have to buy new version of phone every time new version comes out.
    • Even starve yourself to buy new model of phone.
    • Have to have 2 hours of just cell phone time before you go to bed.
    • Have to check social media and scroll down till bottom, first thing in the morning, even when you are late.
    Those are the things I can think about and surprisingly I didn’t have to spend 10 minutes to come up with them all. I have a friend that’s always checking her phone when we are talking and her conversations always starts with, “I saw this on Pinterest….” Or “did you see what he posted on Instagram?” I haven’t heard her talk about stuff other than social media for a while. I felt guilty by reading this post because I sometimes miss amazing moments that happening in front of me because I am on the phone. I would like to pay more attention to what is going on outside of my cell phone screen.

    ReplyDelete
  27. 1. When your phone is about to die you freak out trying to find yours or you ask to borrow someone else's.
    2. When you wake up in the morning and the first thing you do is check all of your social media sites.
    3. Always wanting to have the newest version of the phone even when your current one works perfectly fine.
    4. When you are walking pass someone and you do not want to talk to them so you pretend you are on your phone.
    5. You feel lost whenever you do not have it and that is all you think about.
    6. Unable to eat a meal without posting a picture of it.
    7. Cant go a class period without constantly checking your phone.
    8. You have something to do early in the morning but you still stay up really late because you have to check all of your social media.
    9. You don't like when your phone is right next to you when you are asleep.
    10. You always hear or feel your phone go off even when it doesn't.
    11. When a phone goes off and you know it was your friends next to you and you still check your phone anyway.
    12. Not being able to eat an entire meal without checking your phone.
    13. Checking your social media even though you just checked it five minutes ago.
    14. Using social media to keep tabs on someone instead of just talking to them.
    15. When you text someone that is two feet away from you.
    16. Texting and walking at the same time instead of just waiting till you get to the place you are going to.
    17. Googling something you already know just because it would be faster than thinking about it yourself.
    18. Using the calculator on your phone to use basic math.
    19. Keeping a second charger on you just in case your phone dies.
    20. Taking your phone with you everywhere, class, the kitchen, the bathroom, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I am so guilty of this. I have my phone everywhere I go. If I do not have it, I feel incomplete. A lot of my friends tell me to leave my phone wherever it is, and I get mad at them and of course, I don’t do it. My whole life is on my phone. My whole agenda for the day is on my phone. If I didn’t have my phone with me, I would not know the date or just my schedule for the day. I really am depended on it.
    Things I would add to the list is:
    1. Everywhere you go, you need your phone.
    2. Anywhere you go, you will take a picture.
    3. Every time you leave the house, you need to take a selfie.
    4. Before you leave the house, I make sure my phone is at 100% charged.
    5. I’m always checking my social media.
    6. I constantly check my phone every 10 seconds to see if I got any messages.
    7. I even use my phone in class.
    8. You don’t even take notes anymore, you look at the notes on your phone.
    9. Before you can even eat, you need to have taken a picture of your food.
    10. If I lose sight of my phone, I really do panic.
    11. I feel like my phone is vibrating all the time.
    12. I need to have my phone next to me when I sleep.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I feel like I am guilty for doing some of the behaviors on the list and some that aren't on the list, but I do think I know how to limit myself. For instance, I can go without my phone for days (unless I need it for keeping in contact with my family). I enjoy being without my phone majority of the time and I enjoy being around good company who rarely use their phones as well. I feel like being around people who are always on their phones just kills my mood. But, I would be lying if I said if I never get caught up in my phone sometimes. Here are some things I could add to the list that I myself have done or noticed other people doing:
    - Not leaving the house because your phone is not fully charged.
    - Carrying a charger or external battery because you're worried your phone might die before day ends-- even if your phone is fully charged when you leave the house.
    - Saying "okay" to a person asking you something, but not knowing what it is they asked because you were too busy on your phone and not listening.
    - Forgetting how to write with a pen/pencil because all the notes or assignments you do involve typing on a keyboard.
    - Looking down at your phone to avoid contact with someone you haven't seen in a while, but talk to on social media.
    - Freaking out over where your phone is even though it is in your hand/pocket.
    - Feeling "naked" without your phone.
    - Telling your friends and random people to follow you on social media.
    - Refusing to go out with your friends, but checking their social media to see what they're doing without you.

    ReplyDelete
  30. It's amazing on how our world is coming to this. Honestly I use my phone a lot but I'm not on it as bad as those girls in the video. But on the other hand I see my brother doing exactly that with his phone and I will say he is worse then those girls when it comes to him being on the phone. I mean when he walks into the house he is face timing a friend until he sees them in person tomorrow. Some other things you should add to the list is having a mental breakdown when your phone is about to die. Send a person a text when they are right next to you. Can't enjoy an event you paid to go to like a baseball or football game because you can't get a good picture that shows everyone else how fun the game is.
    This also reminds me on how when I was at an A's game and my girlfriend was on her phone and an amazing play happened when Cespedes threw out a player trying to go home from deep left field and I was amazed. My girlfriend did not see it and complained to me for about 10 minutes for not seeing it and all I said was get off your phone next time.

    ReplyDelete
  31. As much as I like to say I am not addicted to my phone, I am pretty much addicted to my phone. It's crazy thinking how a few years back I would lose my phone for weeks and not even care about it. However, now I go insane if my phone is dead on men. I think one of the reasons for this addiction to phones is the progress phones have made over the years. Phones now do everything,compared to a few years ago it was the standard text, call, and use the internet. A few things that go on the list are tripping on the sidewalk because a piece of it is hanging upwards. As well as pulling out your phone for no reason.

    ReplyDelete
  32. In my opinion, you are addict to your phone when you:
    - Don't see what in front of you while you are walking and using your phone
    - Feel your phone vibrate on the desk or in your pocket while it actually not
    - Check your notification every 5 minutes
    - Don't know how to use a normal map
    I have to say I'm not addict to phone even though I have some behavior above because I came from a different time zone so I check my phone every morning cause that the time my family usually send me message. I also use phone while I'm eating not because I'm checking social network but play games I addict to game more than my phone.

    ReplyDelete
  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  34. As much as our smart phones connect us and help us in our everyday lives, a lot of us are addicted to it and some, quite literally, cannot live without it. Many adults and teenagers experience what is called phantom vibration syndrome. Essentially, people will feel a "vibration" in the pocket of their jean, but in reality their smart phone did not vibrate at all. I wholeheardtly used to feel these "vibrations" in my pocket. I would check my phone every 30 minutes even though I did not receive any notifications. However, I am working on ways to wean myself from my phone as much as possible. I try to take an hour to 2 hour break a day from my phone. I put my phone away when I am dinner, whether it would be with my parents or with friends. I also put my phone in my backpack which makes it a bit more difficult for me to reach it, compared to reaching into my pocket to get it.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Watching this film sadden me because young adults are now forgetting that the simple things are what matter the most. I felt that these two young girls were very disrespectful and selfish to not even bother introducing themselves when they saw Kristen Dunst instead they immediately pulled out there phones and began to take selfies with her; they did not even bother to ask her for permission. In the faces Dunst was making you can tell she was a little annoyed and might have felt objectified because they did not treat her like a normal person that she is. One never really knows if a person just wants to have a casual conversation because they are so caught up with their electronics. Sitting down now at a dinner table and just talking to one another is not consistently practiced anymore. One might believe that they are missing out on events if they don’t take a picture or share it with the people of their social media but reality is they are missing out on a lot more by trying to take everything down.

    ReplyDelete
  36. In this generation our smartphones are our world, we would not know how to live without them. I personally checked my phone all day long; it is a bad habit that was formed a long time ago. Those examples that were talked about have happened to me besides running into a pole. I actually remember one time I had left my phone at home and throughout the day I felt my phone vibrating all day in my pocket. You feel like you are going to miss the latest news if you are not always looking at your phone.
    • Waking up out of your sleep because you feel your phone vibrating
    • Always keeping your charger with you just in case your phone dies
    • While you out in stores and you are using an outlet to charge your phone.
    • You text a person you just saw them but did not speak in person
    • When you are in the same house as a person, but you are texting because you are in a separate room.
    • When you are replying to a text message while you are driving, and you are looking out for the police.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Watching this film sadden me because young adults are now forgetting that the simple things are what matter the most. I felt that these two young girls were very disrespectful and selfish to not even bother introducing themselves when they saw Kristen Dunst instead they immediately pulled out there phones and began to take selfies with her; they did not even bother to ask her for permission. In the faces Dunst was making you can tell she was a little annoyed and might have felt objectified because they did not treat her like a normal person that she is. One never really knows if a person just wants to have a casual conversation because they are so caught up with their electronics. Sitting down now at a dinner table and just talking to one another is not consistently practiced anymore. One might believe that they are missing out on events if they don’t take a picture or share it with the people of their social media but reality is they are missing out on a lot more by trying to take everything down.

    ReplyDelete
  38. - Taking your phone out of your pocket even if you just put it there 3 seconds ago
    - Using your phone as a way to look distracted so you don't have to interact with other people
    - Having over 200 seconds on your Snapchat Story
    - Posting where you are so often that I can locate where you are at any time of the day
    - Having anxiety if you don't immediately look at your phone once you feel a vibration/hear a ring
    - Crying if your phone becomes lost/broken and trying to revive it as if it were a living creature

    I must say, I'm guilty of some of the things listed in the post, in my post, and in others's posts. I'd say that I am (to some degree) addicted to my phone. Sad, but true. I constantly check social media for the newest updates, I pull my phone out to avoid certain people, I sleep with my phone under my pillow, and everything else. But I do know when to put my phone down, such as when I am bonding with friends/family, when I'm working, (I don't drive yet, but when I do) when I drive, when I'm in class, etc.
    The film was actually fairly accurate with today's generation. If they see someone famous, their first instinct is to pull out their phone to snap a picture because let's be real here, no one is going to believe that you just so happened to run into a celebrity just walking down the street. And you'd get comments like "PICS OR IT DIDN'T HAPPEN". But it sucks because they're so focused on getting the photos and updating social media that they don't get to live in the moment and just enjoy their company. Even when I go to Disneyland to meet a character, I talk to them and ask questions (if possible) before I take a picture with them. Our generation needs to learn how to disconnect, or at least learn how to moderate cell phone usage.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I hate when people text me and are able to walk up to me and say what is needed. I think that the internet has made us worst in communicating whether than better. Cell phones are suppose to means of communicating with people in far way distance. When did the communication and distance get taken out. We now use cell phones for listening to music, taking pictures, and surfing the web. When we do use cell phones for communication we text whether than call. I don't get it but I am too guilty of the epidemic.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Technology has arisen so much that people find themselves constantly checking or using their phone without realizing that they are missing so much from other activities. Making a cell phone useful for everything is making us forget how to do simple things like writing(as mentioned on the behaviors above). I commute to school, and while riding on BART every individual is either on their phone or other electronics, few only read or have a conversation with the person next to them. Not only that but communication has gone from meeting up to simply a text message rather than a phone call. I used to be on my phone more than what I should have, but now after looking at my surroundings I realized that making my cell phone a priority will not benefit me from learning more. That is why there should be a limit to the usage of cell phones.Yes, we all have our own opinions but that's just my opinion from personal experience.

    ReplyDelete
  41. This short film of girls being disrespectful to Kirsten Dunst by not introducing themselves or let Kirsten introduce herself is really shocking how this generation has become cell phone addicted. This generation is all about technology and without it most feels useless or have no life. Without cells in their hands every 24/7 they get to go crazy and panic as if its a living thing unfortunately I,m one of those addicted people by not having my phone with me I feel like I've lost something and cant be in peace even though I don't have much of social apps only istagram and texting. I may not think about using my phone when I'm with friends or family to text someone or go instagram, but I do have to use my phone to take selfies and for sure cant eat my food without taking its pic for my instagram. All these addicted people are harming themselves with their cell phones because over time their brain are not capable of memorizing or knowing how to communicate face to face with family and friends so they forget how to be respectful and have manner. Cell phones are both our best friend to help us connect with loved ones, but also can be our enemy by taking us away from real world. What I say is we should know the limit of our cell phone use and not make it be a big part of our lives to ruin us mentally and physically disconnect us from people instead of connecting us.

    ReplyDelete
  42. I feel that technology is getting worse as we progress in the years. You see how each year a new I-Phone comes out and if you don't have the newest one you get talked on because you don't have it. I am like this at times I can't be without my cellphone. While I'm walking to another class I am most on it. The one place that I tend not to have it with me is when we are having dinner in the table. Because its so disrespectful for someone to be on the phone when the family is trying to talk about how their day went or what went wrong that day. Or even when you go on a date with a person your trying to meet and they are on their phone the whole entire time. Cellphones can be a persons best friend but as well as the biggest enemy because this can cause many sickness because of the radioactive it has even though they are not psychical in our hands. We should all try to make a don't use your cell phone event to see how long we would last without a phone.

    ReplyDelete
  43. - Posting the video of your friend falling before checking if they are alright.
    - Snapchatting a picture of the Grand Canyon without appreciating it at all.
    - You talk more to your friends online rather than in person.
    - Instead of taking the time to meet up with people, you'd rather host a group chat learning the same information.
    Living in the technological age, we as people are more inclined to use our phones rather than interacting with people. The sad part is that by allowing technology like cell phones to run our every day lives we become less human. We forget the need to actually talk to someone or the need to remember what it's like to experience something without having to take a picture to remember it all. Just look at Japan for example, the declining birthrate is not due to disease or a new law forbidding reproduction. It's due to the males and females wanting to stay inside and play dating simulations rather than actually go outside and meet someone. However, the ones to blame aren't the companies that are putting out new technology. We, as the consumers, are to blame for allowing ourselves to be sucked into the facade that is the technological age. Maybe the solution to this whole problem is to stop putting out new phones. Barbaric yes, however, by cutting off the problem at its root, maybe the craze can die out.

    ReplyDelete
  44. -Having to check the time on your phone multiple times because the first time you looked, it was just a force of habit and you never processed the information
    -When you would rather text/call a person than walk across campus and talk to them in person
    -Find yourself pressing the refresh button multiple times on a social media website
    -You're friend has to repeat themselves because you weren't listening due to being too busy on your cell phone

    Living in the technologically advanced generation we are in, I am thankful that my childhood was filled with neighborhood activities, sports, cuts/bruises and outdoor games for pastime. Children now-a-day grow up with a dependency on cell phones. As adults, we find ourselves growing an emotional bond with them. That is not the case for some, but most people can admit that they are on some type of technology during multiple parts of their day. We need to figure out how to balance the use of technology in our everyday lives because it is becoming a problem. People are developing anxiety, fear of eye contact, opportunities are being lost due to the focus on a phone, there are online bullies, and many more issue stem from the overuse of phones. I watched a video on youtube once called "Look Up" posted by Gary Turk and it opened my eyes. It touched me so much that I posted it on all of my social media sites (even though that sounds kind of contradicting) and I suggest you watch this video as well. In this short film, through a storyline he shows that if you are constantly on your cell phone you are going to miss so many opportunities life has to offer. The love of your life could walk by, the person sitting next to you on the bus could be your future best friend, I think you get the point. He talks about how we have so many friends online yet when you think about it, how many would you go out of your way to talk to in person? Social media is creating so many false images for women, false ideas of love, false intentions of friendships. Its all an illusion that makes us feel a sense of community when in reality it disconnects us from the community. My favorite quote was "Were a generation of smart phones and dumb people" because it's sadly true, we rely on our phones in basically everything we do. The moral of the video is don't waste your life looking down at a piece of technology, life is happening right now so go live it. I'm guilty too of being a slave but after realization I'm going to try my best to look up from my phone and shut down the displays and distractions.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Some other signs that you might need to kill your cellphone include..

    - seeing a friend fall and taking a picture of them before helping them up/ showing concern

    - snapchatting major things that happen to you before soaking in that they actually happened (ex: putting a snapchat on your snapchat story of you getting proposed to before giving an answer)

    - refreshing your social media feeds every minute or so "just in case"

    - ruining friendships because they didn't "like" one of your posts

    - depending on dating sites like OKCupid to meet new people

    - texting people who are in the same room as you

    - documenting a concert instead of living it

    - going to your phone the second it gets quite

    It's a shame that my generation is so physically and emotionally attached to electronics. In fact, I've heard that Generation X, the generation that I'm a part of, has been dubbed the "Tech Gen". Although I can acknowledge how terrible the dependency the youth today have on technology, I too am guilty of several habits listed above. I feel like that’s how a lot of people are; they’re well aware that it’s no good for them yet they can’t help but feed their addiction. I used the word “addiction” because that’s exactly how it feels. People yearn for their phones and feel lost and disconnected, both literally and theoretically. This may be a little hypocritical, but it absolutely makes me cringe when I see a group of young children on their phones. My Generation may be known for their extensive use of technology but we were not robbed of a, what I believe, is a good childhood. As a child my friends and I would always be outside and if we weren’t, we would be inside playing hide-and-seek, making couch cushion forts, or tending to rollie pollies that we “saved” and took in as pets. Nowadays, children are on their phones and game pieces regardless of their surroundings. Their eyes are too occupied being glued onto their tiny screens to notice that their youthful years are being wasted away with every “refresh”.

    ReplyDelete
  46. Yes, today, a majority of people are walking around "stroking their rectangles", as one IT guy once said, and completely ignoring the human beings around them. From time to time, I am guilty of it, as well. I make a conscious effort to leave my phone in my pocket while I'm walking, but I'll still catch myself doing it when walking to and from my car. Once I realize it, I immediately turn it off and put it in my pocket. I am always careful to lift my head out of my phone any time I'm crossing a street. I recommend you adopt this practice, as well.

    I was recently talking with my uncle, who has a small plot of land in rural West Texas that has no cell service for tens of miles. His 17 year old son, Alex, brought a friend of his along once. The friend became so anxious about not being able to check his phone, they cut their trip short to calm the kid down. I'm glad he did, but knowing my uncle, I can't believe he accommodated the kid's nomophobia.

    Reasons why murdering your cell phone may be a good idea:
    --It's use is fostering insomnia
    --It impedes your academic or work performance
    --You lose focus when you think of your cell and can't regain focus without giving into compulsion of checking in with your phone
    --You're more interested in your phone than your significant other
    --If you are multitasking your hygiene(i.e. brushing teeth, bathing) with your cell usage
    --You can't watch a movie without checking your phone
    --You no longer have thumbprints due to the excessive swiping of your phone

    ReplyDelete
  47. While I understand the concerns proposed, I feel that many people have started to become put off by technology as a result of these issues as well as the frequency in which people compulsively maintain their online personas. Several of my friends have completley abandoned social media as a result of its invasive and superficial nature, some even going as far as to using flip phones in favor of smart phones. I myself have considered deleting all of my social media for similar reasons, yet I too fall victim to the online culture that has been built up over the years. I dont feel like I would lose it if I couldnt check my facebook or twitter feed over the course of a week, but god forbid I ever miss the next upload from Philip DeFranco even once. Perhaps it all comes down to ones personal preferance, you find what matters enough to you that you decide it is going to become an active part of your lifestyle. backtracking to the initial question of whether or not I would Talk to Kirsten Dunst or take a selfie with her; I think I'd just leave her be. Despite having grown up watching and nearly living the original Sam Raimi trilogy of Spider-Man films, I can only imagine the amount of stress and anxiety that comes with that level of celebrity. I do recall reading an article online about her avoidance of the spotlight as a result of her depression and insecurity around the negative criticism she has received from works outside of her tenure as Mary Jane Watson. One lesson I think that can be taken from this as a result is that people highly value their privacy, and that in turn social media destroys that sense of a private life as we each try to build up our own personal celebrity.

    ReplyDelete
  48. When I watched this video, I thought the two girls in the car at the end were going to get in a car crash because they were too distracted by posting their pictures with Kirsten Dunst. That would be a really intense ending, but it definitely would make you think twice about texting and driving. Getting in a crash because of social media is definitely one for the list. Killing your cell phone is a good idea if you:
    -Have physically harmed yourself or others due to social media (car crash, etc)
    -Cyber bully
    -Become antisocial in public due to your phone
    -Feel uncomfortable having face-to-face conversations with people
    -Are too distracted by your phone to get important things done
    -Lose friends because of social media
    -Broadcast everything you do online
    -Get anxiety when you don't have your phone
    -Pay for your internet followers

    ReplyDelete
  49. I seriously loved this piece! Something that came to my head while reading this was how I found myself two feet from a celebrity at Disneyland. All I wanted to do is take a picture of him and share it with my friends ,but then my sister remembered me that he was also just like us. She asked me, "How would you feel if someone random took photos of you without your permission?".

    That is what is wrong with millennial's,we forget that the people online and on magazines are REAL people.That is why we ignore our "internet friends" when we see them on campus or at a party because when we make eye contact we are shocked that that person is standing right in front of us and not on our phone screens.

    ReplyDelete