Thursday, April 27, 2017

17 Majors Where you Might Not Find a Job

Forbes just released a list of  "17 college majors that report higher unemployment." This report completed by PayScale, polled 962,956 workers between March 2014 and March 2016. What they found may or may not be surprising depending on your major, but it correlates with the idea that popular majors may not be the best choice when it comes to finding a job.

So let's take a look.

No. 1 - Physical Education Teaching. 56.4% underemployment.

No. 2. - Human Services. 55.6% underemployment.

No. 3 - Illustration. 54.7% underemployment.

No. 4 - Criminal Justice. 53% underemployment.

No. 5 - Project Management. 52.8% underemployment.

No. 6 - Radio/Television and Film Production. 52.6% underemployment.

No. 7 - Studio Art. 52.0% underemployment.

No. 8 - Health Care Administration. 51.8 % underemployment.

No. 9 - Education. 51.8% underemployment.

No. 10 - Human Development and Family Studies. 51.5% underemployment.

No. 11 - Creative Writing. 51.1% underemployment.

No. 12 - Animal Science. 51.1% underemployment.

No. 13 - Exercise Science. 51% underemployment.

No. 14 - Health Sciences. 50.9% underemployment.

No. 15 - Paralegal Studies. 50.9% underemployment.

No. 16 - Theatre. 50.8% underemployment.

No. 17 - Art History. 50.7% underemployment.

What's surprising about this list is that underemployed majors are not just in the arts and humanities. Specifically, health sciences is on this list and that includes nurses.

How worried are you about getting a job in your major once you graduate?

57 comments:

  1. I can't believe all of those majors' underemployment rates are higher than 50 percent, that means half of the labor force is underemployed. I feel lucky my major is not on that list. I'm sure that if people on that list see this article, they will reconsider about what they want to do in the future. The list also shows that how hard it is to be successful in these fields. But I'm kind of surprised that "education" is on this list. Does that mean half of the teachers aren't able to find a full-time job? Sometimes I think the reason that the rate is so high is because there's not enough career opportunities, and not because of the people are underqualified.

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    1. It is unfortunate that the unemployment rate for the majors listed above are high. It upsets me that hard working students will have a hard time finding jobs after school due to the lack of job stability in the work force. These are students who are fully qualified, some from disadvantage backgrounds, some who will walk out in debt. This hits home because I have an option in media production and that is closely connected to Radio/Television and Film Production. Luckily, my major is in communication and I have a minor in marketing, but the circumstances are different for the rest of the student population.

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  2. Those are a lot of majors with an unemployment rate of at least 50%. Some of them are obvious, in terms of not a lot of jobs in that field(Animal Science, Art History), but I didn't think the unemployment rate would be that high. Paralegal Studies and Criminal Justice are ones that did surprise me at first, but then I thought about how hard the job market is the type of jobs that take those majors. I am not that worried about getting a job in Computer Science because there are tons of jobs and tons of avenues to go with this major whether it is programming for a tech company or programming for video/mobile games. I think experience or an internship will add more to my degree and help get me an entry level job where I can work my way up.

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  3. This is sad because I'm considering to major in Criminal Justice. Will this change in 2 years or what are the majors people should look into? Why are institutions not telling their students that these majors are not being employed. This can prevent students from wasting their money and time in classes where they are not going to get hired. It is not fair for student to work really hard to get their education and for them to find out that they are less likely to get hired. I want to know what is being done for this to be prevented.

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  4. The list of majors surprised me in general. I think that is because when you're in school they don't tell you about how working your tail off to pass these classes and exams won't amount to what you worked for, a job. I am currently a sophomore and a criminal justice major. I came to the conclusion on my own that I wouldn't get a job. But when you do have a longer resume and experience in the field, it's more likely you'll get one. I'm also switching my major to either communications or business.

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  5. So what's the point of going to college or getting an education if you'd end up being unemployed. Is in it worth it if young individuals start getting experiences rather than a degree? Half of individuals who mostly major in humanities such as education, human development, creative writing etc. are underemployment. That half of people with a possible of that degree does not have a job/income. What also crazy is that not just humanities but also people with health science major, like nurse, animal science etc. I thought that health sciences are in demand yet a little over 50 percent are unemployed. I’m just speechless. How did this happened, are they not looking for jobs, hard to find a job, under/overqualified? I want to understand why 50 percent of people who graduated college and earned a degree are unemployed. I was first a human development major, and decide to change it to nursing and now speech pathology and seeing those numbers is crazy. I could be one of those percentage who aren’t employed even if my major is not listed above. Just because my major or other majors are not listed above does not guarantee with an employment after college. You need to show you can do it and have experiences not just have a degree in order to get a job.

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  6. In a University when you are deciding your major that is the hardest thing that ever is done. The list contains many majors that in a university people mostly want to pick. In my Freshman year I had firstly declared my major as Health sciences so I had no idea that the unemployment for that major was really high so I feel really glad that I had changed my major in time before this had happened to me. Now I am glad that I have picked a business major where the availability of the jobs are still good. Many times I have had friends or relatives who had the degree and had achieved very high grades but still had struggled to find jobs in what they had majored in. For Example, many years ago my uncle's friend had majored in Health sciences and had graduated from San Jose state but still had a very hard time in finding a decent job for himself. So for many months he had tried to look for a job where he can practice his skills that he had gotten from his major. The rate should be low by giving people many opportunities to find a good job by creating more jobs all over.

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  7. After reading the statistics, I'm astonish to discover that many career fields are at least more than fifty-percent underemployed, even the health industry. I'm worried about this issue as my major is in the field of nursing. I'm skeptic to find out what lead to this results because it's known that nurses are very demanding. It's also surprising that the field of arts and humanities are underemployed. What about teachers? Don't teachers play a critical role in our society and towards our education. Overall, what majors or field of study should we advice our students then so they can find jobs as soon as they graduate? In my conclusion, I think the results of the underemployment in these fields such as arts, humanities and sciences are due to the popularity as more students are incline to major in these fields.

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  8. The title caught my eye right away. Honestly the first thing I did was look for my major ( political science) and I was expecting it to be on the list. Thankfully it wasn't. But I was really surprised to see Health Science. Health science recently I've noticed has gained a lot of popularity since a lot of students see as a way to get into med school and in the medical field. I was also surprised to see that arts and history was at the bottom of the list. I would think it would be closer to the top because there isn't too much attention around it and a lot of the time people with those degrees say there isn't a lot for them to do.

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  9. That’s a long list! I had no idea that so many majors resulted in underemployment and I’m especially surprised by some of the majors listed, especially health sciences. My major choice is nursing, or pre-nursing right now since I have not gotten into the program at my school, but it’s definitely alarming to see a major that’s closely related to my major choice on the list. A lot of people I know are in the pre-nursing program like me, but end up dropping out, usually due to the highly competitive nature of the program, and once they drop out, most of them choose health sciences as an alternate major. Now, after seeing this list, I feel obligated to let people striving for a degree in health sciences know about the likelihood of becoming unemployed or unable to find work with their major. Personally, I am not very worried about finding work because I am going to become a nurse, one way or another, and the job outlook for nursing is on the rise. However, if I were to choose an alternate major option down the line, I would steer clear of all the majors mentioned in this list.

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  10. The title of this text was very intriguing and jaw dropping. At first, I wondered if my major was going to be listed, but it wasn't. I'm a psychology major and it makes a lot of sense as to why my major isn't listed, now. The stigma of mental illness is slowly in decline so the field is growing rapidly. This makes psychology graduates a commodity. Basically, graduates in my field are in high demand. Unfortunately, I can name one person I know majoring in each and every one of those other majors listed above. I'm personally not worried about finding a job, but I'm worried about my friends not finding a job after spending so much money and time on getting an education. Saying, "that sucks," would be an extreme understatement.

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  11. The fact that the list is so long is concerning. I mean, 17 majors? That's absurd. Not to mention, this is super surprising, especially the fact that health sciences has a high underemployment rate. I would have assumed that nursing is one of the safest majors as there are never enough nurses. But, according to this list, nobody is safe from the unemployment monster. I feel like a lot of us kind of just pick a major that will reward us in the future. Well, at least that's what I did. But, as I starting taking pre-nursing classes, I developed a passion for the human body and everything associated with it. Honestly, now that I've seen this list, I'm really worried about my friends and myself for the majors that we have chosen. It's really scary to think all this hard work we are doing in college might not pay off in the future. What if we did all this hard work for nothing? How do we know for sure that what we are doing will gift us in the future? I guess the answer is: You don't. We are all playing the guessing game at this point. Rolling the dice. See where it takes us.

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  12. This is very concerning, and most definitely makes me reconsider what I'm doing here at cal state east bay. I am undeclared right now but i intend on declaring my major to health science. Before reading this i though if you had a degree in health science you'd be able to do lost of things. however seeing the underemployment rate was around 50% i can't help to wonder what are health science majors doing with their degrees? did some intend on going to medical school but didn't get in? are there not many hospitals offering positions with health science degrees? this is very shocking and id like to know why so many majors in the health field are listed on here.

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  13. I'm shocked to have scrolled down to see all the majors that have a hard time being employed. It hit me hard to see that Health Science, which is a major I was interested in, is number 14 on this list. I expected that it wouldn't be since nursing, along with medical staff is in high demand. It's concerning to think that I may have trouble looking for the job I dream of down the road. I wonder why the unemployment rate is 50%. It makes you really want to stop and think about what it best for the future. I know a lot of people who were looking into this major and it's awful to know that so many of us have a dream to be in a place with low employment rates. I wonder what this means for us, I wonder if people will consider changing majors.

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  14. After reading about these majors I am concerned and shocked for my future. Although I am not quite sure of what I want to be once I graduate from college, I do know that an "education" major is number nine on the list of unemployment rates out of 17 majors. I know that changing your major half way thru your college education is not the best idea, but sometimes re-considering your major after reading something like this will convince you enough to change your major or you might be that 50% on unemployment with a college education. I intend to major in special education but I know that becoming a teacher in this field will be difficult. So I know I will be able to be flexible with this major and maybe turn towards behavioral therapy, or one on one counseling. Something like that...

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  15. I am very surprised to see that all of the majors have an unemployment rate over 50%, meaning only half of the people who graduate with the major can find a job while the other half have nowhere to go. Quite a number of the majors surprised me such as criminal justice ranking third and paralegal studies on the list too. Jobs in the law field should be relatively easy to find as they hire professionals and students who graduated with a particular major are qualified employees. Moreover, majors such as health science and health care administration seem to be in demand of employees. Based on the statistics, I am lucky to say that I am not one of the many majors on the list. However, when it comes to the unemployment rate, it factors the size of the field and the number of graduates. The reason behind the high unemployment rate of the majors on the list seems to be those certain majors having a smaller field than others, resulting the students being unemployed after graduation. As a business major student, I am not worried about being unemployed after I graduate as I am from Hong Kong and the business field offers many opportunities for business students.

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  16. Unfortunately, we all live in a dog eat dog society where competition is everything. It isn't fair how hard working students have to gamble with their time and education hoping to achieve a career. This is a serious flaw in our workforce for demand of occupations. It should be regulated and adjusted so people will be guaranteed a position after graduation but implementing the idea is harder said than done. This will not be solved anytime soon but I hope one day it does for the sake of peoples lives and their dream of a financially stable lifestyle with money being the least of their worries.

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  17. So I guess the rumors are true. Gossip among college peers about the over-educated and unemployed is a favorite. But I would be curious as to the practical career experience of many of those who are unemployed post-graduation - even in the arts/humanities fields.
    I think that students who do not work during their college years are actually doing themselves a disservice despite the time and energy they are able to allocate for their studies and social lives. Personally, I've worked part time during the school year and full time in the summer since I was 15 and I feel that this gives me a little more insight into the resume building tactics and career navigation that my friends who have hardly worked may not know. I definitely don't work as much as some of my peers, and I imagine that they have a step above me. But right now I am working on an internship, which encompasses the practical and soft skills that employers are looking for, according to my contacts with the company and some brief research from LinkedIn and job search professionals.
    All in all, I think that college grads should not worry too much about the stats on unemployment, and instead focus their time and resources into making the most of their time in AND outside of class - leaving college with a small portfolio or resume and the skills they need to make their brand stand out.

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  18. Within this list of 17 majors it provides a brief description of what is desired in today's job market field and what majors lead to specific jobs that are no longer in high demand. Among these 17 majors the percentages are not in the favor of graduates you obtain a degree in these fields because the lists explains that less than 50% of the graduates in these majors will find work after they get their degree. This can be a very overwhelming realization for many graduates who have gotten their degree in these fields and may be discouraging due to the lack of demand in their career path. These majors should bring important questions to students in college right now looking to obtain the most value in their education and to pursue a degree that will pay off once they graduate. I am worried about getting a job after I graduate, however my major is not listed within one of the 17 on this list and is more adaptable to the current job market within today's economy. But this list buts many students into the perspective of selecting a career path in college that will pay off in the long run and will allow them to get a job right out of graduation.

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  19. This list of majors really surprised me, because some major like Project Management, Education, Health Sciences are listed as a useless majors. All listed majors have very high % of unemployment. Every second student can't find job after graduation. This statement made me feel a little bit judgmental, therefore I checked the original Forbes article to make sure that the article is not misleading. Sadly, Forbes article doesn't provide clear detailed information on how Payscale database collected these stats and what was the criteria of collecting these data. Probably, the reason that the rate is so high is because in that particular area there are not enough career opportunities, and not because these student are under qualified. Therefore, it is so hard to make some conclusions about major choices. Therefore, I'm not worried about dubious results of this article.

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  20. This list of underemployed majors surprised me. I didn't expect all of these majors to have a high underemployment, especially in the health sciences. For those pursuing a career in nursing, its sad to see the difficulty of getting a job in this field. As a student pursuing a career in mechanical engineering, I'm aware of the employment rates after graduation, so I'm not too worried. For those seeking a career in any of the popular majors listed above, I think it would be a good idea to have a backup plan just in case.

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  21. I am not concerned with finding a job after I get my kinesiology degree. There are many different career paths under the umbrella of kinesiology. I am more concerned with the opposite side of the spectrum. The majors that are desired and led to job security are impact at universities. Meaning the worry isn't about finding a job when you're out of school but getting into school to begin with. The majors that are deemed as valuable are hard to get into for school and the majors that aren't valued have a hard time finding jobs afterwards. Interesting dynamic, almost a lose-lose for students.

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  22. How worried am I about getting a job in your major once I graduate?
    A lot. It is serious. I would say 10 times every day. Seeing ridiculously high rate of unemployment in my home country, I am almost paranoid about getting a job. Due to my different background, seems like I am the only one who was not that surprised at that 50% of unemployment rate. I guess it is pretty normal because I thought that even business and economics major are one of majors that can not guarantee you a job where I am from. I researched a lot to pick a relatively easier major in the job field before I started the college. So I am majoring in computer science and luckily I found this is quite attractive field to engage in. However, this is not where my passion lies. I wanted to be a marine biologist so I can be near the ocean all the time. I was not brave enough to follow my passion. Well, I am not proud of it but I think that there are so many people who buried their dream for financial stability. Will I regret in the future for not being so brave? Hope not.

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  23. Unfortunately, we now live in the society, which limited jobs can make money to support our lives. Regardless one's interest or ability, to pay student debt, utilities, and rent, people need to find the job that can solve the financial problems. Even worse, it is getting hard to find a job even though people graduate something practical major such a business or something like this. It is truth those majors have a trouble to get a job easily, but I think that if people try their best to find a job or make their creative business themselves, it won't be a big problem.

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  24. I cant say that I am too surprised about many careers result in such high unemployment rates. Given the recent economic crisis, the job market has had a relatively slow recovery in getting people back into the work force.Favoring older more experienced workers as compared to recent college graduates its no wonder that we as a society have a serious issue with youth unemployment. I've spoke with several of my friends and colleagues, many of whom are in more lucrative fields than myself such as in the sciences, engineering, business, etc. Each of them have discussed with their family members about having a contingency plan in the event that their career aspirations do not pan out, opting for jobs in fields that I imagine few of them are truly willing to invest their time in. As an artist myself I understand the risk I put into trying to make a living off of my work, and while I have a contingency plan for myself in the event things don't work out; I refuse to take up a career in which I cannot see myself enjoying a single aspect of what I do, regardless of pay. The real tragedy here if we're being completely honest is that while we invest thousands of dollars into education to fulfill our career aspirations, many of us will be forced into working jobs we hate for the purposes of buying things we don't need. This all in the name of contributing to the larger corporate entity that has become common place within the western world, rather than leading lives in which we truly could be the masters of our own destiny.

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  25. Perhaps one of the biggest eye-openers for me upon reading this article is the fact that all of the listed majors in the article has an underemployment rate of 50%+, which means that only roughly half of these major graduates will be able to find a job and career after completing higher education. I was especially shocked due to the fact that I initially thought that many of the listed majors (e.g. criminal justice, animal science, paralegal studies) are potentially useful in today's job market, however this article seems to state otherwise. Fortunately for me, my chosen major (bioengineering) is not on the list, therefore my decision to head into this field will remain unfazed and unchanged. Perhaps one of the limitations of the statistics provided by this article would be the size of the field, as it seems that the majority of the listed majors in the article are relatively smaller fields in comparison to the other careers the job market today demands. Therefore, I am not too worried about my decision to go into the bioengineering field, but I definitely do worry for the family members and friends who have chosen one of the listed careers in this article. Who knows, maybe the future may hold a brighter future for these academic fields.

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  26. A list like this, to me, is unsurprising. There are many professions out there that are somewhat unneeded in today's society. As society changes then so does its needs. In these days society needs more scientists/engineers/other STEM related fields to further on society. A lot of the majors on this list I find to be already over inflated, and colleges today should stop trying to sell these majors as a good way to go, when the majority of the people with those degrees end up without a job in their field. Which is most unfortunate. People could avoid that by simply have picking a different major, or even a specialization within a major.

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  27. It doesn't really surprise me that the majority of these listed majors include a varying amount of arts based choices. My sister recieved her masters in art at UCLA and is still searching for opportunities at art galleries in SF and LA. I think that the demand in todays society reflects the unemployment rates to some degree, but it was interesting to see that Health sciences made the list. I'm not so sure what entails "Health Sciences" but as I pursue my Medical education for a doctorates in Endocrinology or Cardiology, I am assured in my ability to find employment, as my field levys high flexibilty. Whether I want to run an independent clinic or join Kaiser is completely my choice.I hope that those who want to pursue an education in something they actually love to do, get the opportunity to do so.

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  28. When it comes to finding jobs after college, it's nerve wrecking and difficult. It doesn't surprise me that the unemployment rate for many of these majors is high. Being that they are very popular majors, too, it's probably even more difficult due to the fact that everyone has the same background. I think what makes one stand out more than the other when it comes to having the same major and looking for a job is their resume and what they bring, other than a degree in a field, to the table. What makes them stand out more? Many, many people want to nurses. The supply and demand of nurses is out of balance if the unemployment rate for nurses is high. It's the same for many other careers too. It's important, to love what one does and hopefully people get the chance to do that.

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  29. I am very surprised about these unemployment numbers with these certain majors. I am a human development major with a minor in criminal justice and all the research that I conducted shows the job market is very high. I could see how the unemployment for art and theater majors because they are not demanding jobs.The one that I am most surprised about is that the health sciences unemployment is high. We need doctors and nurses because without them how would we humans be able to get the care that we need.

    This article really makes me think about, after graduating college how hard it really is to find a job. It is really scary to think about because we spend all this time and money for a college education and may not even get the job we want once we graduate.

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  30. This list definitely surprised me. I know so many people that are majoring in a few of these topics, and it saddens me that they could have a harder time finding a job. This is mind blowing especially because, this may be their passion, and they might have to consider changing it in order to survive. Many people believe that going to college will guarantee you a job or career, but many times this is not the case. The fact that Health sciences is on the list surprises me even more. So many people ate studying to be in or graduate in the nursing field, and they don't know that underemployment in their field. We always hear about how the medical field is one that people should be into because the demand is so high. To be informed that their is underemployment in this field is ironic. Overall, I feel that it is very sad that so many people might have change their major because they might not get a job.

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  31. After looking at the list, it surprises me because some majors like, Health Care Administration, Health Science, and education are popular, and I thought people who has one of these major will easy to find a job. But these majors are surprisingly in the unpopular job list. However, seeing this list help us to rethink when we choose the major. We should not only follow our passion; we should think and choose the major that will help us in the future. Luckily, my major is not in this list. My major is mathematics now, and I am planing to change to Human Services. After looking at this list, I have less interested in changing my major because I do not want to waste my education, degree for nothing. After graduating, I want to have a job without spending so much time on finding a job.

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  32. After having a look at the list, I feel worried about my future. Being a computer science major I become a part of a very competitive field of study. Majors like arts and health sciences are trending but at the same time college graduates of the following majors face unemployment. Why should I be worried, I ask myself ? The answer is really easy, all these majors are really tied up. With the rapid development in the field of technology and computers,the future prospect of me getting a job is a little fading. But I strongly feel me getting a job does not really depend on the job market situation but my diligence towards the discipline.

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  33. I feel very worried because after looking at this list I'm not quite sure what major I want to be doing. Especially because my major was included on this list which I had no idea of. Its hard to find a major that you would like to find a job in that you would enjoy for the rest of your life. For example the the people that are in the arts. There are so many talented people that study theater, music or art and love it but then after they graduate with that degree they can't find a well paying job anywhere. What did surprise me is that there were some jobs such as health sciences that have a low rate on finding a job. That's why so many people end up going back to school to study a major that they don't even enjoy but they are only studying it because they know it will be easier to find a job right after they graduate. Which I really hope that won't happen to me

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  34. It is crazy to know that many of the majors on the list have a underemployment of above 50%, especially because I know a couple of people with those certain major such as criminal justice and project management. Although many of the major are underemployed, I wonder if this list has changed the opinion of many people. If i were to be a student with a major in theatre I would probably change my mind unless I know I am very good at what I do in terms of theatre. I do feel worried because we may never know, maybe my major will be underemployed within the next year. A lot can change after just one year.

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  35. I am a little worried about the job prospects, but not just for my major but others that I'm considering. I really want to be a nurse, and I hear that there isn't really as bad unemployment, especially compared to other majors. But I'm not one hundred percent sold on majoring in nursing, and I am considering other careers. Some of the majors I'm thinking about are on this list, and this makes me really worried. It makes me think about if I really want to change majors or change to one that has a higher rate of employment. At the very least this makes me consider what I will do in my academic career and really think about the consequences.

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  36. Reading this blog post I was actually shocked to find out that even people in health care administration, nurses, and criminal justice graduates are underemployed. It shocked me because I have always been told that getting a job in healthcare is pretty easy since hospitals are always needing nurses, doctors, etc. Seeing that theatre and art history graduates are underemployed is more understandable because the arts and social sciences are not as popular as they used to be. Looking at the list and seeing that nursing graduates are even underemployed is scary because that is the field I want to go into and to see that it is underemployed worries me.

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  37. I completely disagree with this article especially about the part about how health care admin. is at 51.8% unemployment rate. I personally know that nurses, especially in the bay area are in high demand right now. How I know this is through my mother. She always tells me about how Kaiser is always looking to hire more people. Not only that, but just in general health care is very in demand because people are always dying. The numbers for each class are also very high, which seems very fake to me.

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  38. This post really gives the sense of dread for people in school mainly because we are reminded that out in the real world you might not even get the job you want , even after all this hard work you put in. Although to my surprise I never suspected nurses to on this list because I consider it to be a difficult major but I wonder why unemployment rates are down for this major specifically. Physical education being number one doesn't surprise be because its an easy major and degree to attain which is why amny poepel head towards this goal. A factor that might have to do with the unemployment is where the people live because someone could live in Los Angeles where there are a ton of Animal Sciences making it impacted, while there are little people in Colorado studying Animal sciences making jobs available there.

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  39. Looking at all the majors listed above it really surprised me because most are science/health related. I always thought that health care would be great to major in whether it was nursing or just health science because of the supposedly high demand needed. I know that a lot of people have jobs not even relating to their major, but got a job because they have the degree. I am hoping to become a nurse and knowing now that I might not be able to even get a job after I graduate scares me because I am studying to be a nurse, not something else.

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  40. Reading this post made me a little worried about my future career, seeing the unemployment rates for health science and health care administration was shocking to me. My major is in Nursing and that somewhat ties in with the health science major. Just thinking about how you could graduate and STILL not find a job in the real world is beyond stressful. I don't want to waste my time, education, and money.

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  41. Seeing all of the unemployment rates have shocked me and made me worried about what I am majoring because I am aware that Nursing is very competitive. I am not worried about finding a job after I graduate because I know there are other states that needs more nurses. But what I am afraid of is being able to get in the program. I just hope I get into the program and I become a Nurse because I am doing this for myself and my family.

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  42. Personally, I am very surprised from the this list. I had expectations for art and theater to have high unemployment rates, but I did not know that education would have such high unemployment rates. Criminal justice also did not surprise me, because I feel like it is a competitive field to be entering. My major is and career pursuits involve business and anthropology/geography, so I am not worried about being able to find a job, because many companies have an increasing desire for employees to have cultural and environmental (human interactions w/ environment) knowledge as the world becomes more connected and globalized.

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  43. The fact that Health Science, and Health Care Administration majors have such high unemployment rates makes me a little uneasy about my major since I plan on becoming a nurse. It was made clear to me that the process to becoming a nurse is pretty competitive but I didn't think the unemployment rate would be so high. Although I'm confident that I will become a nurse, I will definitively take some time to find my plan B.

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  44. The most surprising part about this post was seeing that Criminal Justice and Health Care Administration were among the majors that have underemployment. I honestly expected that Criminal Justice majors could find work as something at a nearby police department or for a federal law office. Also, I would imagine that there is a demand for Health Care administration so that was shocking to me to find that it was on this list. I myself, do not feel worried about being unemployed after getting my degree. I am a Computer Science major and I think that the demand for Computer Science majors is expanding due to the increases in technology. I feel confident that if I just acquire my degree that I will get a nice and high paying job for a tech company such as Google, Apple, Microsoft, etc.

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  45. Anthonete (TUBS) Cantiller
    English 1001-10
    After reading all the different majors that get underemployed it kind of makes me sad because I'm currently a Health Science Major and that fact that it's 50.9% underemployed it makes me feel I won't get a job in the future. Luckily though I do plan do minor in Business and pursue in having a food truck when I get older. But my all time dream of being a dentist is not crushed just yet I have faith in myself to be successful and to make my family and friends proud.

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  46. I am surprise with the project management!

    In my opinion, I do not think major affect the job opportunity. The job opportunity counts on your ability not really on your major. If you really equip the ability fit with some jobs, you will find a job! The ability is not only about the specific skill, but also teamwork, communication and more!

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  47. I already knew art, fine art, education, and writing had a big unemployment rate in their fields but not the health field! I was so shocked to read it, but this just affirmed my worst fears about career options in the field. This has now got me thinking about going to my counselor to get more information about this. I am in the Biology of Humans cluster that is for Health Care Majors. I was thinking about switching to that if I do not get into the nursing program but after reading this I know I have to think of a better back up because of the fact that the unemployment rate for the Health Science field has an underemployment rate over fifty percent. I need to look more into unemployment rates for different fields and starting salaries so I can prepare myself.

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  48. Seeing this post and the percentages of unemployment in certain majors, specially in Health Science shocked me. One of the reasons why I picked Nursing was because it seems like a job that I will always have. There's tons of hospitals everywhere but I do notice that there's many people wanting to become nurses so that may be a reason for the unemployment rate. I am now wondering about being able to find a job as a nurse and if it will be easy to achieve it.

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  49. Areej Abed
    Surprisingly, eventhough Health Science is on the list for unemployment, I am not too worried about getting a job with my major once I graduate. I do not want to be a nurse like a lot of others in this major, thus I am working towards becoming a sonographer. The requirements are much different than that of a nurse. What is required of me is experience of atleast 4 months and a two year program that is madatory for that career. With me getting my Bachelor's degree it sets me apart from other job applicators and gives me more of an advanatge. I feel confident that after I gradaute I will find a job easily within this field. However, there are so many job competitors and this makes me uneasy. Eventually, I will grdauate with a Health Science major and hoepfully, easily become a sonographer.

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  50. I am really surprised with this list. I had no idea how many majors had a high percent of underemployment. I am surprised that criminal justice forms part of this list with a 53% underemployment, I had no idea how high that percent could be for that major.It seems that most underemployment rates are in Health Science majors. I am extremely worried about getting a job after I graduate college. My majors is nursing which falls in the Health and Science field.This makes me get worried became it is home of the majors with the highest underemployed percent.This tells me that it will be complicated to get a job as a nurse once I graduate college.This makes me think about changing my major because it will be complicated getting a job as a nurse due to the unemployment percent. Many people are studying for majors in the Health and Science field especially nursing.

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  51. I am really shocked with this list because the unemployment rate is really high for some mayors,such as criminal justice. This is really interesting because there are so many people who want to become a criminal justice mayor,but then knowing that there are many unemployed people with this mayor.

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  52. The list did not really surprise me because today it is very hard to even get a simple job at a local store. The majors listed are ones that take an actual dedication and talent to want and to succeed in. As wanting to be a nurse in the medical field it takes a lot of bumpy roads to get there as it is very competitive. I find it upsetting that a person like myself and people who are already nurse, risk their financial stability to be successful in life. Though I ask myself sometimes, is it really worth it? The reason I say that is because there are music artist out there who don't even have a diploma but are worth millions! It will take a nurse a couple of years working to reach that amount.

    People decide to make Youtube channels of their relationships and everyday life and are getting paid 60K+ a month, able to avoid luxury things, nice houses, etc. It is not fair but life isn't fair either. I wonder to myself, why don't I just do that and get money fast than going to college but that's not the type of path I would take plus it is too personal and I really want my degree. As of right now I will continue to strive for straight A's and do whatever it takes to make one of my dreams come true!

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  53. Looking at this list surprised me a lot. I thought once you received your education and completed your studies you were automatically promised a job in your field. But I guess I am wrong. Since my major is Nursing it has relations to the Health Science major and their underemployment is 50.9%. It makes me kind of hesitant to know that I am not promised a job once I complete my education but I do know that the reason for this is because the field very competitive to get into. I know that in order for me to become successful and find a job that I am qualified for, I need to have lots of hands on experience. This will make me stand out and show employers that I have the ability to work hard and complete many tasks.

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  54. It is quite common for art and writing majors to have a hard time finding a job, because they have to stay with the rapidly growing generation. They have to stay on task with people in the world so they can keep them interested with their arts and writing. It's surprising yet it's expected that health science and nurses are on this list. These majors are very competitive and they want people who can handle and who know what they're doing. Some people stay on the waiting list until they finally get into the program. Other people might find it easier to find a job for health science and nursing because they're willing to go out of state. It really just takes time with settling yourself with a specific major because you have to know what you're doing and make sure to avoid as much mistakes as possible.

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  55. This is not the first time i have seen this list so I am not shocked, but when I saw it for the first time I was. Its not news that it has become more and more difficult to find a job anywhere you go. Its not uncommon for people with art degrees to be unemployed because unless what your selling is number one material, its hard for anyone to find interest.My major is not on there necessarily but half of it is. I am a Biology Major with an emphasis in forensics but criminal justice is part of what I do. I am not saying it is going to be easy for me to find a job but I am glad my major is not on the list.

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  56. Its pretty horrible that 50 percent of the majors are down that road. But for me I am not concerned about the money I will make or if I can land a job in that career. As a radiologist job rates are very well and they pay will make you financially stable. I am satisfied my major was not on that list of majors.

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