Sunday, July 17, 2011

Dance + Comics = Personal Mythologies

Art Speigelman, author of Maus a comic book about the Holocaust, collaborated with the Philobolus dance company on a project where Sunday strip characters were animated to create dancing comics.

These dancing comics resulted in a mash up of ancient and modern mythologies; where Pan and Medusa ran head on into the Sunday funnies, noir film, detective novels, and movie classics to create a personal mythology, or dream life, that presents a slightly skewed world view, all set to the tinny tunes of early jazz.

Speigelman calls this collaboration a new language, which he termed Still Moving in a short interview he gave about his collaboration with Philobolus.


In addition, Speigelman talks about stories, characters, and movies that resonate from his childhood, stories like The Wizard of Oz and characters like the early Hapless Hooligan from the Sunday funnies. What stories or characters made an impact on your childhood?

Highlights from the Philobolus world premier of Still Moving:


What makes up your personal mythology or dream life? Do you resonate with stories from classic mythology or your own religious beliefs?

Do have fond memories of Johnny Quest, Scooby Doo, or Sponge Bob? What cartoons or comics did you enjoy as a child and how do these stories impact your personality?

2 comments:

  1. The childhood characters that made an impact on my life are Tommy from The Rugrats and the tv show Kennan and Kel. I enjoyed The Rugrats cartoon because they always went on adventures that every kid wished they could go on. I used to watch Kennan and Kel everytime it came on TV. They impacted my personality by making me more outgoing, I saw how couragous Tommy was and love how funny Kennan and Kel were and wanted to be just like them.

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  2. I've developed my eagerness to travel by following the adventures of Tintin. Tintin was a reporter who would never work and seemed to live comfortably while living great adventures, he managed to get on the moon without having to take any math course like any astronaut would have to! Reading Tintin also developed my taste for History, understanding the social/political context of many stories developed by the author, but also to comprehend the period when the comics were released.

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